The confusion is even worse if you want to fly internationally. Official fares to most countries are set via a treaty organization called the IATA, so most computer systems list only IATA fares for international flights. It's easy to find entirely legal ``consolidator'' tickets sold for considerably less than the official price, however, so an online or offline agent is extremely useful for getting the best price. The airlines also can have some impressive online offers on their web sites.
In theory, all the systems show the same data; in practice, however, they get a little out of sync with each other. If you're looking for seats on a sold-out flight, an airline's home system is most likely to have that last, elusive seat. If you're looking for the lowest fare to somewhere, check all four systems because a fare that's marked as sold out on one system often mysteriously reappears on another system. Some airlines have rules about flight segments that are not supposed to be sold together even though they're all available, and at least once I got a cheap US Airways ticket on Expedia, which didn't know about all the US Airways rules even though I couldn't get it on their own site or Travelocity which did know about them. On the other hand, many airlines have available some special deals that are only on their own Web sites and maybe a few of the online agencies. Confused? You should be. We are.
From Québec City to Fort Lauderdale (FLL) From Québec City to Bangkok (BKK) From Québec City to San Juan (SJU) From Québec City to Paris (CDG) From Québec City to Athens (ATH) From Québec City to Kahului (OGG) From Québec City to Havana (HAV) From Québec City to Cancún (CUN) From Québec City to Barcelona (BCN) From Québec City to Hanoi (HAN) From Québec City to Honolulu (HNL) From Québec City to Lyon (LYS) From Québec City to San José (SJO) From Québec City to Punta Cana (PUJ) From Québec City to Miami (MIA) From Québec City to Managua (MGA) From Québec City to Liberia (LIR) From Québec City to Dublin (DUB) From Québec City to Ho Chi Minh City (SGN) From Québec City to Las Vegas (LAS) From Québec City to Lisbon (LIS) From Québec City to Fort Myers (RSW) From Québec City to West Palm Beach (PBI) From Québec City to Vancouver (YVR) From Québec City to Puerto Vallarta (PVR) From Québec City to Zagreb (ZAG) From Québec City to Calgary (YYC) From Québec City to Tampa (TPA) From Québec City to San Salvador (SAL) From Québec City to Rome (FCO)
After security checkpoints close for the night, all passengers are restricted to the landside areas, and must re-clear security the next day when the checkpoints open. Travellers report that there are some armrest-free benches in the pre-security departure area, but warn that sleep becomes problematic with the early AM opening of the security checkpoints. The nearby arrivals area is quieter and darker, but all seating here reportedly comes with armrests. For uninterrupted sleep, there are hotels near the airport. See Airport Hotels in the airport guide below.
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Get out of town! Plattsburgh International Airport (PBG) makes it easy with a growing list of airlines and destinations. Plattsburgh International Airport is currently serving numerous warm and sunny destinations through Allegiant and Spirit.  New in August 2018 PBG will also be served by United Express connecting passengers to Washington-Dulles and beyond through their travel alliance network. You can find out all the details at United.com. For detailed information on the airlines and the destinations, they serve please see the chart below. 
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Travel dates back to antiquity where wealthy Greeks and Romans would travel for leisure to their summer homes and villas in cities such as Pompeii and Baiae.[7] While early travel tended to be slower, more dangerous, and more dominated by trade and migration, cultural and technological advances over many years have tended to mean that travel has become easier and more accessible.[8] Mankind has come a long way in transportation since Christopher Columbus sailed to the new world from Spain in 1492, an expedition which took over 10 weeks to arrive at the final destination; to the 21st century where aircraft allow travel from Spain to the United States overnight.
Travel in the Middle Ages offered hardships and challenges, however, it was important to the economy and to society. The wholesale sector depended (for example) on merchants dealing with/through caravans or sea-voyagers, end-user retailing often demanded the services of many itinerant peddlers wandering from village to hamlet, gyrovagues (Wandering Monks) and wandering friars brought theology and pastoral support to neglected areas, travelling minstrels practiced the never-ending tour, and armies ranged far and wide in various crusades and in sundry other wars.[7] Pilgrimages were common in both the European and Islamic world and involved streams of travellers both locally (Canterbury Tales-style) and internationally.[9]
Cases of sexual assault against female travellers have been reported. Always travel in groups and avoid isolated areas, including unsupervised beaches, especially at night. Never leave food or drinks unattended or in the care of strangers. Be wary of accepting snacks, beverages, gum or cigarettes from new acquaintances, as they may contain drugs that could put you at risk of sexual assault.
Travel dates back to antiquity where wealthy Greeks and Romans would travel for leisure to their summer homes and villas in cities such as Pompeii and Baiae.[7] While early travel tended to be slower, more dangerous, and more dominated by trade and migration, cultural and technological advances over many years have tended to mean that travel has become easier and more accessible.[8] Mankind has come a long way in transportation since Christopher Columbus sailed to the new world from Spain in 1492, an expedition which took over 10 weeks to arrive at the final destination; to the 21st century where aircraft allow travel from Spain to the United States overnight.
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