Quebec City Jean Lesage International Airport consists of a small, recently renovated terminal with 16 gates, and a half dozen eateries and shops, including duty free. WiFi is available to help pass the time and there are plenty of outlets for charging mobile devices. Additional comfort can be found through fee-based access to the airport’s first-class lounge.  See Airport Lounges in the airport guide below.
After security checkpoints close for the night, all passengers are restricted to the landside areas, and must re-clear security the next day when the checkpoints open. Travellers report that there are some armrest-free benches in the pre-security departure area, but warn that sleep becomes problematic with the early AM opening of the security checkpoints. The nearby arrivals area is quieter and darker, but all seating here reportedly comes with armrests. For uninterrupted sleep, there are hotels near the airport. See Airport Hotels in the airport guide below. 

The Peterborough region has a vibrant and expanding aerospace and aviation sector, including a variety of operations located at or in close proximity to Peterborough’s airport and aerospace industrial park. Situated with easy access to Montreal, Toronto, and the United States border, the Peterborough region provides a strategic advantage for businesses interested in expanding or relocating. Supporting the aviation and aerospace industry is a high priority for the local community with ongoing investment and infrastructure improvements in this important sector.
​​​​Charlotte Douglas International Airport is the sixth busiest airport in the world offering more than 160 nonstop destinations around the globe. CLT oversees more than 700 departures and landings each day, and is served by seven domestic carriers and three foreign flag carriers. As American Airlines' second largest hub and the second largest airport on the East Coast, CLT connects passengers to exotic locations throughout the world.
Travel dates back to antiquity where wealthy Greeks and Romans would travel for leisure to their summer homes and villas in cities such as Pompeii and Baiae.[7] While early travel tended to be slower, more dangerous, and more dominated by trade and migration, cultural and technological advances over many years have tended to mean that travel has become easier and more accessible.[8] Mankind has come a long way in transportation since Christopher Columbus sailed to the new world from Spain in 1492, an expedition which took over 10 weeks to arrive at the final destination; to the 21st century where aircraft allow travel from Spain to the United States overnight.
Four giant airline computer systems in the United States handle nearly all the airline reservations in the country. (They're known as CRSs, for computer reservations systems, or more often now GDS for global distribution systems.) Although each airline has a ``home'' CRS, the systems are all interlinked so that you can, with few exceptions, buy tickets for any airline from any CRS. The dominant systems in the U.S. are Sabre (home to American and US Airways), Galileo (home to United), Worldspan (home to Delta, Northwest), and Amadeus (many European lines.) The company that owned Galileo and Orbitz recently bought Worldspan, so the two GDS will presumably be merged. Many of the low-price start-up airlines don't participate in any of these systems but have their own Web sites where you can check flights and buy tickets. Southwest, the largest and oldest of the low-price airlines, doesn't participate, either. Southwest's web site gets car and hotel info from Galileo, but the info seems not to flow the other way. Orbitz one of the big three online travel agencies, runs its own system which is "direct connect" linked directly to many of the airlines.
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