By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.
A travel warning, travel alert, or travel advisory is an official warning statement issued by a government agency to provide information about the relative safety of travelling to or visiting one or more specific foreign countries or destinations.[1] The purpose is to enable travelers to make an informed decision about a particular travel destination, and to help travellers prepare adequately for what may be encountered on their trip. In the United States, travel warnings are issued by the Department of State and are often called warden messages.[2][3] 

Airline Information is an established leader and innovator in commercial airline & travel industry conferences. Since 2005, Airline Information has hosted thousands of airline and travel professionals at the company’s groundbreaking conferences, workshops and networking events. We bring together professionals working in and with the airline & travel industry for educational discussions, career advancement and doing business.
* I hereby give my consent to my data being processed by the Company so it can send business/promotional information by automatic contact methods (such as e-mail, SMS or MMS) and traditional methods (such as by post or telephone calls with operators) on Company products/services, notification of company events, market research and statistical analyses
After reaching Ouagadougou, the next stage of their journey would have seen them head to a reforestation project in Togo, which is considered safer by GAC. But getting there overland would have required a journey through another red zone in southern Burkina Faso. ("Avoid all travel to 40 km within borders of Benin and Togo due to the threat of banditry and terrorism.")
The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) of the US Department of Homeland Security requires us to collect information from you for purposes of watch list screening, under the authority of 49 U.S.C. section 114, and the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004. Providing this information is voluntary; however, if you don't provide it, you may be subject to additional screening or denied transport or authorisation to enter the post-security area. TSA may share information you provide with law enforcement or intelligence agencies or others under its published system of records notice. For more on TSA Privacy policies, or to view the system of records notice and the privacy impact assessment, visit tsa.gov.
A travel warning, travel alert, or travel advisory is an official warning statement issued by a government agency to provide information about the relative safety of travelling to or visiting one or more specific foreign countries or destinations.[1] The purpose is to enable travelers to make an informed decision about a particular travel destination, and to help travellers prepare adequately for what may be encountered on their trip. In the United States, travel warnings are issued by the Department of State and are often called warden messages.[2][3]
"prismic": {"header-footer":{"query":"[[:d = at(document.type, \"header-footer\")]]"},"headerLinks":{"query":"[[:d = at(document.type, \"links\")][:d = at(my.links.headerOrFooter, \"header\")][:d = at(my.links.isInHamburger, \"no\")][:d = at(my.links.isInPartnerMenu, \"no\")]]","orderings":"[my.links.priority]","pageSize":9999},"partnerLinks":{"query":"[[:d = at(document.type, \"links\")][:d = at(my.links.headerOrFooter, \"header\")][:d = at(my.links.isInHamburger, \"no\")][:d = at(my.links.isInPartnerMenu, \"yes\")]]","orderings":"[my.links.priority]","pageSize":9999},"headerHamburgerLinks":{"query":"[[:d = at(document.type, \"links\")][:d = at(my.links.headerOrFooter, \"header\")][:d = at(my.links.isInHamburger, \"yes\")]]","orderings":"[my.links.priority]","pageSize":9999},"subLinks":{"query":"[[:d = at(document.type, \"links\")][:d = at(my.links.pageGroup, \"newsAdvisories\")][:d = at(my.links.headerOrFooter, \"header\")]]","pageSize":9999},"footerLinks":{"query":"[[:d = at(document.type, \"links\")][:d = at(my.links.headerOrFooter, \"footer\")]]","orderings":"[my.links.priority]","pageSize":9999},"hrefs":{"query":"[[:d = at(document.tags, [\"href\"])]]","pageSize":9999},"current-page":{"query":"[[:d = at(document.type, \"travel-advisory-page\")]]"},"travelAdvisory":{"query":"[[:d = at(document.type, \"travel-advisory\")]]","orderings":"[my.travel-advisory.order]","pageSize":9999},"facebook-section":{"query":"[[:d = at(document.type, \"facebook-section\")]]"},"testimonials":{"query":"[[:d = at(document.type, \"testimonial\")][:d = at(my.testimonial.testimonial_type, \"Partner\")]]"}}
The travel advisory was supported by LGBTQ activities based in The Bahamas – Erin Greene and Alex D’Marco – who told local newspaper Tribune 242 that they understood where Canada was coming from. Greene called it a “sound, a reasonable advisory” while D’Marco noted how LGBT Bahamians “can’t advance in their career” and have no access to marriage, hormones and medications. She also said that LGBTQ people can’t rely on the police for help in times of need.
CAA North & East Ontario serves Members in Ontario in the cities of North Bay, Ottawa, Sudbury and Thunder Bay; the Districts of Cochrane, Manitoulin, Nipissing, Parry Sound, Rainy River, Timiskaming, and Kenora (including area of Patricia); and the Counties of Dundas, and Glengarry, including the portion of Leeds-Grenville formerly known as Grenville County, Lanark, Prescott, Renfrew, Russell, and Stormont.
Environment Canada has issued the following warning: a vigorous low pressure system will approach the Alaskan Panhandle tonight. Southeast winds of 90 km/h gusting to 110km/h over Haida Gwaii will develop this afternoon. These winds will spread to the Central Coast - Coastal Sections tonight. As the frontal wave associated with this low passes through the north coast of British Columbia, winds will briefly peak at southeast 90 km/h gusting to 110km/h.  The winds will ease early Tuesday Morning. As a result there is a possibility of service impacts in order to ensure safe travel for our customers. 

By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.
In theory, all the systems show the same data; in practice, however, they get a little out of sync with each other. If you're looking for seats on a sold-out flight, an airline's home system is most likely to have that last, elusive seat. If you're looking for the lowest fare to somewhere, check all four systems because a fare that's marked as sold out on one system often mysteriously reappears on another system. Some airlines have rules about flight segments that are not supposed to be sold together even though they're all available, and at least once I got a cheap US Airways ticket on Expedia, which didn't know about all the US Airways rules even though I couldn't get it on their own site or Travelocity which did know about them. On the other hand, many airlines have available some special deals that are only on their own Web sites and maybe a few of the online agencies. Confused? You should be. We are.
We appreciate your patience and apologize for any inconvenience you may experience as a result of this schedule change. The safety of our passengers and crew is of primary importance to us. We don’t take the decision to cancel sailings lightly, as we know customers rely on our service to get to their destinations. We will resume service as soon as it is safe to do so.
* I hereby give my consent to my data being processed by the Company so it can send business/promotional information by automatic contact methods (such as e-mail, SMS or MMS) and traditional methods (such as by post or telephone calls with operators) on Company products/services, notification of company events, market research and statistical analyses
Travel in the Middle Ages offered hardships and challenges, however, it was important to the economy and to society. The wholesale sector depended (for example) on merchants dealing with/through caravans or sea-voyagers, end-user retailing often demanded the services of many itinerant peddlers wandering from village to hamlet, gyrovagues (Wandering Monks) and wandering friars brought theology and pastoral support to neglected areas, travelling minstrels practiced the never-ending tour, and armies ranged far and wide in various crusades and in sundry other wars.[7] Pilgrimages were common in both the European and Islamic world and involved streams of travellers both locally (Canterbury Tales-style) and internationally.[9]
Wait times are assessed automatically as follows: on departure, the passenger’s boarding pass is scanned when he/she enters the queue, then again just before he/she begins the individual screening process and, on arrival, when the passenger lines up in the visitors or residents queue in the primary inspection area and again when he/she exits from the area behind the customs officers’ posts.
In the late 16th century it became fashionable for young European aristocrats and wealthy upper class men to travel to significant European cities as part of their education in the arts and literature. This was known as the Grand Tour, it included cities such as London, Paris, Venice, Florence and Rome. However, The French revolution brought with it the end of the Grand Tour.[7]
Travel dates back to antiquity where wealthy Greeks and Romans would travel for leisure to their summer homes and villas in cities such as Pompeii and Baiae.[7] While early travel tended to be slower, more dangerous, and more dominated by trade and migration, cultural and technological advances over many years have tended to mean that travel has become easier and more accessible.[8] Mankind has come a long way in transportation since Christopher Columbus sailed to the new world from Spain in 1492, an expedition which took over 10 weeks to arrive at the final destination; to the 21st century where aircraft allow travel from Spain to the United States overnight.
×