The first step to an international trip is to read our Traveler’s Checklist to find out things to consider before you go. Pay special attention to our safety and security information and assess for yourself the risk of traveling to a particular country or region. Some U.S. citizens with special considerations – such as students, women, and LGBTI travelers – may face additional challenges when abroad. If you do decide to travel, make a plan for what to do if something goes wrong overseas. 
Environment Canada has issued the following warning: a vigorous low pressure system will approach the Alaskan Panhandle tonight. Southeast winds of 90 km/h gusting to 110km/h over Haida Gwaii will develop this afternoon. These winds will spread to the Central Coast - Coastal Sections tonight. As the frontal wave associated with this low passes through the north coast of British Columbia, winds will briefly peak at southeast 90 km/h gusting to 110km/h.  The winds will ease early Tuesday Morning. As a result there is a possibility of service impacts in order to ensure safe travel for our customers.
Be wary of “friendly” strangers. There have been reports of alleged sexual assaults at tourist resorts carried out by resort staff and, in some cases, by other tourists. Women travelling alone are often harassed. Refrain from excessive drinking, especially at all-inclusive resorts. Although most hotels and resorts are well guarded, ensure that your hotel room doors and windows are secure.
Reasons for traveling include recreation,[5] tourism[5] or vacationing,[5] research travel,[5] the gathering of information, visiting people, volunteer travel for charity, migration to begin life somewhere else, religious pilgrimages[5] and mission trips, business travel,[5] trade,[5] commuting, and other reasons, such as to obtain health care[5] or waging or fleeing war or for the enjoyment of traveling. Travellers may use human-powered transport such as walking or bicycling; or vehicles, such as public transport, automobiles, trains and airplanes.
Travel dates back to antiquity where wealthy Greeks and Romans would travel for leisure to their summer homes and villas in cities such as Pompeii and Baiae.[7] While early travel tended to be slower, more dangerous, and more dominated by trade and migration, cultural and technological advances over many years have tended to mean that travel has become easier and more accessible.[8] Mankind has come a long way in transportation since Christopher Columbus sailed to the new world from Spain in 1492, an expedition which took over 10 weeks to arrive at the final destination; to the 21st century where aircraft allow travel from Spain to the United States overnight.

Travel dates back to antiquity where wealthy Greeks and Romans would travel for leisure to their summer homes and villas in cities such as Pompeii and Baiae.[7] While early travel tended to be slower, more dangerous, and more dominated by trade and migration, cultural and technological advances over many years have tended to mean that travel has become easier and more accessible.[8] Mankind has come a long way in transportation since Christopher Columbus sailed to the new world from Spain in 1492, an expedition which took over 10 weeks to arrive at the final destination; to the 21st century where aircraft allow travel from Spain to the United States overnight.


IMPORTANT NOTICE: Canadians travelling for tourism purposes in a European Union country must hold a passport valid for at least three (3) months beyond the date of expected return from that country (exceptions: United Kingdom and Ireland require a valid Canadian passport only). For sun destinations, the validity period must usually be at least six (6) months beyond the date of expected return. Regulations may vary for non-Canadian passport holders.
Travel by water often provided more comfort and speed than land-travel, at least until the advent of a network of railways in the 19th century. Travel for the purpose of tourism is reported to have started around this time when people began to travel for fun as travel was no longer a hard and challenging task. This was capitalised on by people like Thomas Cook selling tourism packages where trains and hotels were booked together.[10] Airships and airplanes took over much of the role of long-distance surface travel in the 20th century, notably after the second World War where there was a surplus of both aircraft and pilots.[7]
After security checkpoints close for the night, all passengers are restricted to the landside areas, and must re-clear security the next day when the checkpoints open. Travellers report that there are some armrest-free benches in the pre-security departure area, but warn that sleep becomes problematic with the early AM opening of the security checkpoints. The nearby arrivals area is quieter and darker, but all seating here reportedly comes with armrests. For uninterrupted sleep, there are hotels near the airport. See Airport Hotels in the airport guide below.
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Cases of sexual assault against female travellers have been reported. Always travel in groups and avoid isolated areas, including unsupervised beaches, especially at night. Never leave food or drinks unattended or in the care of strangers. Be wary of accepting snacks, beverages, gum or cigarettes from new acquaintances, as they may contain drugs that could put you at risk of sexual assault.
Whether you have a layover, overnight sleepover or you are just quickly passing through, our Quebec City Airport Guide is a great place to start planning your visit.  Here, you’ll find information on services and facilities available inside the airport – including details about airport lounges, WiFi, mobile charging points, lockers, 24-hour food options, nearby hotels, and everything in between.
CAA North & East Ontario serves Members in Ontario in the cities of North Bay, Ottawa, Sudbury and Thunder Bay; the Districts of Cochrane, Manitoulin, Nipissing, Parry Sound, Rainy River, Timiskaming, and Kenora (including area of Patricia); and the Counties of Dundas, and Glengarry, including the portion of Leeds-Grenville formerly known as Grenville County, Lanark, Prescott, Renfrew, Russell, and Stormont.
Airline Information is an established leader and innovator in commercial airline & travel industry conferences. Since 2005, Airline Information has hosted thousands of airline and travel professionals at the company’s groundbreaking conferences, workshops and networking events. We bring together professionals working in and with the airline & travel industry for educational discussions, career advancement and doing business.
In theory, all the systems show the same data; in practice, however, they get a little out of sync with each other. If you're looking for seats on a sold-out flight, an airline's home system is most likely to have that last, elusive seat. If you're looking for the lowest fare to somewhere, check all four systems because a fare that's marked as sold out on one system often mysteriously reappears on another system. Some airlines have rules about flight segments that are not supposed to be sold together even though they're all available, and at least once I got a cheap US Airways ticket on Expedia, which didn't know about all the US Airways rules even though I couldn't get it on their own site or Travelocity which did know about them. On the other hand, many airlines have available some special deals that are only on their own Web sites and maybe a few of the online agencies. Confused? You should be. We are.
})(window,document,'script','dataLayer','GTM-NMR6ZR');×Toggle navigation Travel InsuranceCanadian ResidentsSeniorsVisitorsStudentsTravel Insurance FAQsBlogClaimsWhat to Do in a Medical EmergencyHow to Make a ClaimWhat We DoClaims FAQsmyTuGoPartnersWhy Partner With Us?Licensed Insurance BrokersTuGo’s Affiliate ProgramExisting PartnersPartner PlatformPartner FAQsAffiliate PortalToggle navigation About UsWho We AreCEO's MessageSocial ResponsibilityCanada's Best ManagedCareersContact UsNews & AdvisoriesNewsPress ReleasesTravel AdvisoriesDeveloper PortalPasser au françaisLove to travel? Sign up for travel tips & inspiration!NewsPress ReleasesTravel AdvisoriesCanadian Travel AdvisoriesLooking for the latest Canadian travel advisories? You’ve come to the right place.Get updates on travel advisories and health information issued by the Government of Canada, before travelling abroad.Travel Advisory: High Levels of Violence Linked to Organized Crime in MexicoJanuary 11, 2019Due to high levels of violence linked to organized crime, Global Affairs Canada advises against all non-essential travel to Mexico’s northern and western states. These areas include the northern states of Nuevo León (except the city of Monterrey), Sinaloa (except the city of Mazatlán), Sonora (except the cities of Hermosillo and Guaymas/San Carlos) and Tamaulipas, and the western states of Guerrero (including Acapulco but excluding the cities of Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo and Taxco), Michoacán (excluding the city of Morelia) and Colima (excluding the city of Manzanillo).Show MoreHow does TuGo® Travel Insurance protect those who were planning to travel from, to or through Mexico?Trip Cancellation & Trip InterruptionAs per the policy wording, coverage is available when the Canadian government has issued a travel advisory that recommends to “Avoid all travel” or “Avoid non-essential travel” on the contracted dates to the contracted destination. The advisory must be issued after the policy was purchased and after the trip was booked.If travellers are making changes to their travel plans, they should contact their airline providers before Claims at TuGo.How to contact Claims atTuGoFor more information about your coverage or for travel assistance, you can reach Claims atTuGotoll-free at 1-800-663-0399 or collect at 604-278-4108.Please be aware that travel warnings are updated regularly. For the latest advisory status, visit the Global Affairs Canada or Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) website.Show LessSelect your destination(s) to see if there are any travel advisories or warnings.Select oneSearchLet’s be friends. Join a community of travellers. Get access to promotions, contests and the latest travel news.Like TuGoAbout UsWho We areCEO's MessageSocial ResponsibilityCanada's Best ManagedCareersContact UsTravel InsuranceCanadian ResidentsSeniorsVisitorsStudentsTravel Insurance FAQsYour PolicymyTuGoHow to Make a ClaimWhat to Do in a Medical EmergencyWhat We DoClaims FAQsNews & AdvisoriesNewsPress ReleasesTravel AdvisoriesWhy Partner With Us?Licensed Insurance BrokersTuGo’s Affiliate ProgramExisting PartnersPartner PlatformPartner FAQsAffiliate PortalOtherBlogDeveloper PortalTravel AdvisoriesLanguagePasser au françaisAbout UsWho We areCEO's MessageSocial ResponsibilityCanada's Best ManagedCareersContact UsTravel InsuranceCanadian ResidentsSeniorsVisitorsStudentsTravel Insurance FAQsYour PolicymyTuGoHow to Make a ClaimWhat to Do in a Medical EmergencyWhat We DoClaims FAQsNews & AdvisoriesNewsPress ReleasesTravel AdvisoriesWhy Partner With Us?Licensed Insurance BrokersTuGo’s Affiliate ProgramExisting PartnersPartner PlatformPartner FAQsAffiliate PortalOtherBlogDeveloper PortalTravel AdvisoriesLanguagePasser au françaisLove to travel? Sign up for travel tips & inspiration!Social Media© TuGo, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Terms of Service Privacy Policy Our Underwriters×Search TuGo We use cookies to give you the best possible experience of our website.If you continue, we’ll assume you’re happy for your web browser to receive all cookies from our website. You can learn more about our use of cookies in our Terms of Service and our Privacy Policy.×Advisory ResultsLoading...SecurityEntry / Exit RequirementsHealthLaws & CultureNatural Disasters & ClimateHelp AbroadContains information licensed under the Open Government License - CanadaClose$(document).ready(function () {
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