Environment Canada has issued the following warning: a vigorous low pressure system will approach the Alaskan Panhandle tonight. Southeast winds of 90 km/h gusting to 110km/h over Haida Gwaii will develop this afternoon. These winds will spread to the Central Coast - Coastal Sections tonight. As the frontal wave associated with this low passes through the north coast of British Columbia, winds will briefly peak at southeast 90 km/h gusting to 110km/h.  The winds will ease early Tuesday Morning. As a result there is a possibility of service impacts in order to ensure safe travel for our customers.
IMPORTANT NOTICE: Canadians travelling for tourism purposes in a European Union country must hold a passport valid for at least three (3) months beyond the date of expected return from that country (exceptions: United Kingdom and Ireland require a valid Canadian passport only). For sun destinations, the validity period must usually be at least six (6) months beyond the date of expected return. Regulations may vary for non-Canadian passport holders.
Whether you have a layover, overnight sleepover or you are just quickly passing through, our Quebec City Airport Guide is a great place to start planning your visit.  Here, you’ll find information on services and facilities available inside the airport – including details about airport lounges, WiFi, mobile charging points, lockers, 24-hour food options, nearby hotels, and everything in between.
A travel warning, travel alert, or travel advisory is an official warning statement issued by a government agency to provide information about the relative safety of travelling to or visiting one or more specific foreign countries or destinations.[1] The purpose is to enable travelers to make an informed decision about a particular travel destination, and to help travellers prepare adequately for what may be encountered on their trip. In the United States, travel warnings are issued by the Department of State and are often called warden messages.[2][3]
The confusion is even worse if you want to fly internationally. Official fares to most countries are set via a treaty organization called the IATA, so most computer systems list only IATA fares for international flights. It's easy to find entirely legal ``consolidator'' tickets sold for considerably less than the official price, however, so an online or offline agent is extremely useful for getting the best price. The airlines also can have some impressive online offers on their web sites.
After reaching Ouagadougou, the next stage of their journey would have seen them head to a reforestation project in Togo, which is considered safer by GAC. But getting there overland would have required a journey through another red zone in southern Burkina Faso. ("Avoid all travel to 40 km within borders of Benin and Togo due to the threat of banditry and terrorism.")

After security checkpoints close for the night, all passengers are restricted to the landside areas, and must re-clear security the next day when the checkpoints open. Travellers report that there are some armrest-free benches in the pre-security departure area, but warn that sleep becomes problematic with the early AM opening of the security checkpoints. The nearby arrivals area is quieter and darker, but all seating here reportedly comes with armrests. For uninterrupted sleep, there are hotels near the airport. See Airport Hotels in the airport guide below.
Four giant airline computer systems in the United States handle nearly all the airline reservations in the country. (They're known as CRSs, for computer reservations systems, or more often now GDS for global distribution systems.) Although each airline has a ``home'' CRS, the systems are all interlinked so that you can, with few exceptions, buy tickets for any airline from any CRS. The dominant systems in the U.S. are Sabre (home to American and US Airways), Galileo (home to United), Worldspan (home to Delta, Northwest), and Amadeus (many European lines.) The company that owned Galileo and Orbitz recently bought Worldspan, so the two GDS will presumably be merged. Many of the low-price start-up airlines don't participate in any of these systems but have their own Web sites where you can check flights and buy tickets. Southwest, the largest and oldest of the low-price airlines, doesn't participate, either. Southwest's web site gets car and hotel info from Galileo, but the info seems not to flow the other way. Orbitz one of the big three online travel agencies, runs its own system which is "direct connect" linked directly to many of the airlines.
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