ATMs / Cash Machines – Need cash? ATMs, operated by Scotiabank, are available. Fees may apply, so be sure to check your bank’s fee schedule and your daily withdrawal limit if you are travelling internationally. You may also want to notify your bank of your travel plans. Locations: on the ground floor in both International and Domestic Arrival areas • Landside, 2nd Floor (near Tim Horton’s) • Airside, 2nd floor.
After security checkpoints close for the night, all passengers are restricted to the landside areas, and must re-clear security the next day when the checkpoints open. Travellers report that there are some armrest-free benches in the pre-security departure area, but warn that sleep becomes problematic with the early AM opening of the security checkpoints. The nearby arrivals area is quieter and darker, but all seating here reportedly comes with armrests. For uninterrupted sleep, there are hotels near the airport. See Airport Hotels in the airport guide below. 

IMPORTANT NOTICE: Canadians travelling for tourism purposes in a European Union country must hold a passport valid for at least three (3) months beyond the date of expected return from that country (exceptions: United Kingdom and Ireland require a valid Canadian passport only). For sun destinations, the validity period must usually be at least six (6) months beyond the date of expected return. Regulations may vary for non-Canadian passport holders.
In theory, all the systems show the same data; in practice, however, they get a little out of sync with each other. If you're looking for seats on a sold-out flight, an airline's home system is most likely to have that last, elusive seat. If you're looking for the lowest fare to somewhere, check all four systems because a fare that's marked as sold out on one system often mysteriously reappears on another system. Some airlines have rules about flight segments that are not supposed to be sold together even though they're all available, and at least once I got a cheap US Airways ticket on Expedia, which didn't know about all the US Airways rules even though I couldn't get it on their own site or Travelocity which did know about them. On the other hand, many airlines have available some special deals that are only on their own Web sites and maybe a few of the online agencies. Confused? You should be. We are.
Four giant airline computer systems in the United States handle nearly all the airline reservations in the country. (They're known as CRSs, for computer reservations systems, or more often now GDS for global distribution systems.) Although each airline has a ``home'' CRS, the systems are all interlinked so that you can, with few exceptions, buy tickets for any airline from any CRS. The dominant systems in the U.S. are Sabre (home to American and US Airways), Galileo (home to United), Worldspan (home to Delta, Northwest), and Amadeus (many European lines.) The company that owned Galileo and Orbitz recently bought Worldspan, so the two GDS will presumably be merged. Many of the low-price start-up airlines don't participate in any of these systems but have their own Web sites where you can check flights and buy tickets. Southwest, the largest and oldest of the low-price airlines, doesn't participate, either. Southwest's web site gets car and hotel info from Galileo, but the info seems not to flow the other way. Orbitz one of the big three online travel agencies, runs its own system which is "direct connect" linked directly to many of the airlines.
×