Email (phishing) and telephone scams are common methods used by criminals to lure people into disclosing personal information such as credit card numbers and account information. These scams intentionally impersonate trusted brands to leverage goodwill and avoid suspicion. They appear to be authentic and may go so far as to use logos and official sounding email addresses.
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Today, Peterborough’s airport and Aerospace Industrial Park is a leading base supporting national and international aerospace manufacturing, aircraft and engine overhaul and maintenance, charter operations, corporate and general aviation aerospace trades, education, tourism, private aircraft owners and operators, and aviation support activities. The restaurant located in the Air Terminal offers a magnificent view of the runway, aprons and flight activities.

NAV CANADA also publishes the Canadian Airport Charts (airport diagrams) airport diagrams publication. The information in the Canadian Airport Charts provides pictorial displays of Canadian airport manoeuvring areas found in the Canada Air Pilot or the military GPH 200, and may be reproduced for the sole purpose of assisting pilots during aircraft ground movement operations. Up-to-date information on flight planning procedures and airport services, including fuel, lighting and local prohibitions or procedures is found in the Canada Flight Supplement.

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By submitting a comment, you accept that CBC has the right to reproduce and publish that comment in whole or in part, in any manner CBC chooses. Please note that CBC does not endorse the opinions expressed in comments. Comments on this story are moderated according to our Submission Guidelines. Comments are welcome while open. We reserve the right to close comments at any time.
A travel warning, travel alert, or travel advisory is an official warning statement issued by a government agency to provide information about the relative safety of travelling to or visiting one or more specific foreign countries or destinations.[1] The purpose is to enable travelers to make an informed decision about a particular travel destination, and to help travellers prepare adequately for what may be encountered on their trip. In the United States, travel warnings are issued by the Department of State and are often called warden messages.[2][3]
After reaching Ouagadougou, the next stage of their journey would have seen them head to a reforestation project in Togo, which is considered safer by GAC. But getting there overland would have required a journey through another red zone in southern Burkina Faso. ("Avoid all travel to 40 km within borders of Benin and Togo due to the threat of banditry and terrorism.")
Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) required 72-hrs before U.S. travel Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) required 72-hrs before U.S. travel  Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) required 72-hrs before U.S. travel collapsed Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) required 72-hrs before U.S. travel expanded
The origin of the word "travel" is most likely lost to history. The term "travel" may originate from the Old French word travail, which means 'work'.[3] According to the Merriam Webster dictionary, the first known use of the word travel was in the 14th century. It also states that the word comes from Middle English travailen, travelen (which means to torment, labor, strive, journey) and earlier from Old French travailler (which means to work strenuously, toil). In English we still occasionally use the words "travail", which means struggle. According to Simon Winchester in his book The Best Travelers' Tales (2004), the words "travel" and "travail" both share an even more ancient root: a Roman instrument of torture called the tripalium (in Latin it means "three stakes", as in to impale). This link may reflect the extreme difficulty of travel in ancient times. Today, travel may or may not be much easier depending upon the destination you choose (e.g. Mt. Everest, the Amazon rainforest), how you plan to get there (tour bus, cruise ship, or oxcart), and whether you decide to "rough it" (see extreme tourism and adventure travel). "There's a big difference between simply being a tourist and being a true world traveler", notes travel writer Michael Kasum. This is, however, a contested distinction as academic work on the cultures and sociology of travel has noted.[4] 

A travel warning, travel alert, or travel advisory is an official warning statement issued by a government agency to provide information about the relative safety of travelling to or visiting one or more specific foreign countries or destinations.[1] The purpose is to enable travelers to make an informed decision about a particular travel destination, and to help travellers prepare adequately for what may be encountered on their trip. In the United States, travel warnings are issued by the Department of State and are often called warden messages.[2][3]
I hereby give my consent to my data being processed by the Company so it can send business/promotional information by automatic contact methods (such as e-mail, SMS or MMS) and traditional methods (such as by post or telephone calls with operators) on Company products/services, notification of company events, market research and statistical analyses
Reasons for traveling include recreation,[5] tourism[5] or vacationing,[5] research travel,[5] the gathering of information, visiting people, volunteer travel for charity, migration to begin life somewhere else, religious pilgrimages[5] and mission trips, business travel,[5] trade,[5] commuting, and other reasons, such as to obtain health care[5] or waging or fleeing war or for the enjoyment of traveling. Travellers may use human-powered transport such as walking or bicycling; or vehicles, such as public transport, automobiles, trains and airplanes.

The confusion is even worse if you want to fly internationally. Official fares to most countries are set via a treaty organization called the IATA, so most computer systems list only IATA fares for international flights. It's easy to find entirely legal ``consolidator'' tickets sold for considerably less than the official price, however, so an online or offline agent is extremely useful for getting the best price. The airlines also can have some impressive online offers on their web sites.
Luggage Storage & Lockers – Baggage storage is not available; however, you can store small items such as coats, shoes/boots, keys.   Inquire at the Information Booth near the airport check-in for service. Rates: $2.35 per day or $14.60 per week for coats or boots and $2.35 per day for small items such as keys. Debit cards, credit cards and CAD$ accepted.
Live information is provided by air carriers and is refreshed every 1 minutes. The information contained on this site may be incomplete, inaccurate or out of date at the time you consult it. All information on this site is subject to change without notice. We do not guarantee that this information is accurate, complete and up to date. We are not responsible for damages, caused directly or indirectly through the use or the inability to use such information.
We appreciate your patience and apologize for any inconvenience you may experience as a result of this schedule change. The safety of our passengers and crew is of primary importance to us. We don’t take the decision to cancel sailings lightly, as we know customers rely on our service to get to their destinations. We will resume service as soon as it is safe to do so.

Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) required 72-hrs before U.S. travel Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) required 72-hrs before U.S. travel  Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) required 72-hrs before U.S. travel collapsed Electronic System for Travel Authorization (ESTA) required 72-hrs before U.S. travel expanded

Four giant airline computer systems in the United States handle nearly all the airline reservations in the country. (They're known as CRSs, for computer reservations systems, or more often now GDS for global distribution systems.) Although each airline has a ``home'' CRS, the systems are all interlinked so that you can, with few exceptions, buy tickets for any airline from any CRS. The dominant systems in the U.S. are Sabre (home to American and US Airways), Galileo (home to United), Worldspan (home to Delta, Northwest), and Amadeus (many European lines.) The company that owned Galileo and Orbitz recently bought Worldspan, so the two GDS will presumably be merged. Many of the low-price start-up airlines don't participate in any of these systems but have their own Web sites where you can check flights and buy tickets. Southwest, the largest and oldest of the low-price airlines, doesn't participate, either. Southwest's web site gets car and hotel info from Galileo, but the info seems not to flow the other way. Orbitz one of the big three online travel agencies, runs its own system which is "direct connect" linked directly to many of the airlines.


Four giant airline computer systems in the United States handle nearly all the airline reservations in the country. (They're known as CRSs, for computer reservations systems, or more often now GDS for global distribution systems.) Although each airline has a ``home'' CRS, the systems are all interlinked so that you can, with few exceptions, buy tickets for any airline from any CRS. The dominant systems in the U.S. are Sabre (home to American and US Airways), Galileo (home to United), Worldspan (home to Delta, Northwest), and Amadeus (many European lines.) The company that owned Galileo and Orbitz recently bought Worldspan, so the two GDS will presumably be merged. Many of the low-price start-up airlines don't participate in any of these systems but have their own Web sites where you can check flights and buy tickets. Southwest, the largest and oldest of the low-price airlines, doesn't participate, either. Southwest's web site gets car and hotel info from Galileo, but the info seems not to flow the other way. Orbitz one of the big three online travel agencies, runs its own system which is "direct connect" linked directly to many of the airlines.
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