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The Peterborough Airport was purchased by the City in 1967 and was opened for scheduled services in 1969 following an expansion and licensing by Transport Canada. With an area of 830 acres, it is located 5 km south of the city. The airport has grown progressively over the years, it has been home to scheduled and charter air services, flight training schools, Maintenance, Repair and Overhaul (MRO), and other specialty aviation and support businesses over the past several decades.
Reasons for traveling include recreation,[5] tourism[5] or vacationing,[5] research travel,[5] the gathering of information, visiting people, volunteer travel for charity, migration to begin life somewhere else, religious pilgrimages[5] and mission trips, business travel,[5] trade,[5] commuting, and other reasons, such as to obtain health care[5] or waging or fleeing war or for the enjoyment of traveling. Travellers may use human-powered transport such as walking or bicycling; or vehicles, such as public transport, automobiles, trains and airplanes.
Travel by water often provided more comfort and speed than land-travel, at least until the advent of a network of railways in the 19th century. Travel for the purpose of tourism is reported to have started around this time when people began to travel for fun as travel was no longer a hard and challenging task. This was capitalised on by people like Thomas Cook selling tourism packages where trains and hotels were booked together.[10] Airships and airplanes took over much of the role of long-distance surface travel in the 20th century, notably after the second World War where there was a surplus of both aircraft and pilots.[7]

The first step to an international trip is to read our Traveler’s Checklist to find out things to consider before you go. Pay special attention to our safety and security information and assess for yourself the risk of traveling to a particular country or region. Some U.S. citizens with special considerations – such as students, women, and LGBTI travelers – may face additional challenges when abroad. If you do decide to travel, make a plan for what to do if something goes wrong overseas. 
After security checkpoints close for the night, all passengers are restricted to the landside areas, and must re-clear security the next day when the checkpoints open. Travellers report that there are some armrest-free benches in the pre-security departure area, but warn that sleep becomes problematic with the early AM opening of the security checkpoints. The nearby arrivals area is quieter and darker, but all seating here reportedly comes with armrests. For uninterrupted sleep, there are hotels near the airport. See Airport Hotels in the airport guide below.
After reaching Ouagadougou, the next stage of their journey would have seen them head to a reforestation project in Togo, which is considered safer by GAC. But getting there overland would have required a journey through another red zone in southern Burkina Faso. ("Avoid all travel to 40 km within borders of Benin and Togo due to the threat of banditry and terrorism.")

The origin of the word "travel" is most likely lost to history. The term "travel" may originate from the Old French word travail, which means 'work'.[3] According to the Merriam Webster dictionary, the first known use of the word travel was in the 14th century. It also states that the word comes from Middle English travailen, travelen (which means to torment, labor, strive, journey) and earlier from Old French travailler (which means to work strenuously, toil). In English we still occasionally use the words "travail", which means struggle. According to Simon Winchester in his book The Best Travelers' Tales (2004), the words "travel" and "travail" both share an even more ancient root: a Roman instrument of torture called the tripalium (in Latin it means "three stakes", as in to impale). This link may reflect the extreme difficulty of travel in ancient times. Today, travel may or may not be much easier depending upon the destination you choose (e.g. Mt. Everest, the Amazon rainforest), how you plan to get there (tour bus, cruise ship, or oxcart), and whether you decide to "rough it" (see extreme tourism and adventure travel). "There's a big difference between simply being a tourist and being a true world traveler", notes travel writer Michael Kasum. This is, however, a contested distinction as academic work on the cultures and sociology of travel has noted.[4]

SYRIA - TERRORISM - Latakia - UPDATE: A car bomb detonated in the government-held Syrian city of Latakia, in the Sahat al-Hamam district, killing one person and wounding 14   INDIA - SECURITY - Gadchiroli - Suspected Maoists shot dead three villagers in Maharashtras Gadchiroli district on suspicion that their tip-off to police led to killing of 40 ultras.   PHILIPPINES - SECURITY - Rizal - NPA terrorists attack construction workers in Quezon, burn equipment. Checkpoints were also beef-up in the area while troops are conducting pursuit operations.   INDONESIA - FLOODING - Makassar - Parts of Makassar City were flooded following incessant heavy rain. Floodwaters reached height of up to 1.5 meters in Katimbang, Biringkanayan Sub-district.   ZIMBABWE - BUS - Government deploys armed soldiers and police para-military support unit to man ZUPCO buses carrying passengers after rioting last week.    Travel Smart… Travel Safe … www.eTravelAlerts.com

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The Transportation Security Administration (TSA) of the US Department of Homeland Security requires us to collect information from you for purposes of watch list screening, under the authority of 49 U.S.C. section 114, and the Intelligence Reform and Terrorism Prevention Act of 2004. Providing this information is voluntary; however, if you don't provide it, you may be subject to additional screening or denied transport or authorisation to enter the post-security area. TSA may share information you provide with law enforcement or intelligence agencies or others under its published system of records notice. For more on TSA Privacy policies, or to view the system of records notice and the privacy impact assessment, visit tsa.gov.
CAA North & East Ontario serves Members in Ontario in the cities of North Bay, Ottawa, Sudbury and Thunder Bay; the Districts of Cochrane, Manitoulin, Nipissing, Parry Sound, Rainy River, Timiskaming, and Kenora (including area of Patricia); and the Counties of Dundas, and Glengarry, including the portion of Leeds-Grenville formerly known as Grenville County, Lanark, Prescott, Renfrew, Russell, and Stormont.

After reaching Ouagadougou, the next stage of their journey would have seen them head to a reforestation project in Togo, which is considered safer by GAC. But getting there overland would have required a journey through another red zone in southern Burkina Faso. ("Avoid all travel to 40 km within borders of Benin and Togo due to the threat of banditry and terrorism.")


Reasons for traveling include recreation,[5] tourism[5] or vacationing,[5] research travel,[5] the gathering of information, visiting people, volunteer travel for charity, migration to begin life somewhere else, religious pilgrimages[5] and mission trips, business travel,[5] trade,[5] commuting, and other reasons, such as to obtain health care[5] or waging or fleeing war or for the enjoyment of traveling. Travellers may use human-powered transport such as walking or bicycling; or vehicles, such as public transport, automobiles, trains and airplanes.
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