In the late 16th century it became fashionable for young European aristocrats and wealthy upper class men to travel to significant European cities as part of their education in the arts and literature. This was known as the Grand Tour, it included cities such as London, Paris, Venice, Florence and Rome. However, The French revolution brought with it the end of the Grand Tour.[7]

After security checkpoints close for the night, all passengers are restricted to the landside areas, and must re-clear security the next day when the checkpoints open. Travellers report that there are some armrest-free benches in the pre-security departure area, but warn that sleep becomes problematic with the early AM opening of the security checkpoints. The nearby arrivals area is quieter and darker, but all seating here reportedly comes with armrests. For uninterrupted sleep, there are hotels near the airport. See Airport Hotels in the airport guide below.


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If you are flying solely within the UK, including Northern Ireland, you do not need a passport but we advise that you carry photographic identification with you when travelling, such as your passport or driving licence. This may be requested at certain points in your journey. Children under the age of 16 years do not require identification to travel within the UK.

})(window,document,'script','dataLayer','GTM-NMR6ZR');×Toggle navigation Travel InsuranceCanadian ResidentsSeniorsVisitorsStudentsTravel Insurance FAQsBlogClaimsWhat to Do in a Medical EmergencyHow to Make a ClaimWhat We DoClaims FAQsmyTuGoPartnersWhy Partner With Us?Licensed Insurance BrokersTuGo’s Affiliate ProgramExisting PartnersPartner PlatformPartner FAQsAffiliate PortalToggle navigation About UsWho We AreCEO's MessageSocial ResponsibilityCanada's Best ManagedCareersContact UsNews & AdvisoriesNewsPress ReleasesTravel AdvisoriesDeveloper PortalPasser au françaisLove to travel? Sign up for travel tips & inspiration!NewsPress ReleasesTravel AdvisoriesCanadian Travel AdvisoriesLooking for the latest Canadian travel advisories? You’ve come to the right place.Get updates on travel advisories and health information issued by the Government of Canada, before travelling abroad.Travel Advisory: High Levels of Violence Linked to Organized Crime in MexicoJanuary 11, 2019Due to high levels of violence linked to organized crime, Global Affairs Canada advises against all non-essential travel to Mexico’s northern and western states. These areas include the northern states of Nuevo León (except the city of Monterrey), Sinaloa (except the city of Mazatlán), Sonora (except the cities of Hermosillo and Guaymas/San Carlos) and Tamaulipas, and the western states of Guerrero (including Acapulco but excluding the cities of Ixtapa/Zihuatanejo and Taxco), Michoacán (excluding the city of Morelia) and Colima (excluding the city of Manzanillo).Show MoreHow does TuGo® Travel Insurance protect those who were planning to travel from, to or through Mexico?Trip Cancellation & Trip InterruptionAs per the policy wording, coverage is available when the Canadian government has issued a travel advisory that recommends to “Avoid all travel” or “Avoid non-essential travel” on the contracted dates to the contracted destination. The advisory must be issued after the policy was purchased and after the trip was booked.If travellers are making changes to their travel plans, they should contact their airline providers before Claims at TuGo.How to contact Claims atTuGoFor more information about your coverage or for travel assistance, you can reach Claims atTuGotoll-free at 1-800-663-0399 or collect at 604-278-4108.Please be aware that travel warnings are updated regularly. For the latest advisory status, visit the Global Affairs Canada or Public Health Agency of Canada (PHAC) website.Show LessSelect your destination(s) to see if there are any travel advisories or warnings.Select oneSearchLet’s be friends. Join a community of travellers. Get access to promotions, contests and the latest travel news.Like TuGoAbout UsWho We areCEO's MessageSocial ResponsibilityCanada's Best ManagedCareersContact UsTravel InsuranceCanadian ResidentsSeniorsVisitorsStudentsTravel Insurance FAQsYour PolicymyTuGoHow to Make a ClaimWhat to Do in a Medical EmergencyWhat We DoClaims FAQsNews & AdvisoriesNewsPress ReleasesTravel AdvisoriesWhy Partner With Us?Licensed Insurance BrokersTuGo’s Affiliate ProgramExisting PartnersPartner PlatformPartner FAQsAffiliate PortalOtherBlogDeveloper PortalTravel AdvisoriesLanguagePasser au françaisAbout UsWho We areCEO's MessageSocial ResponsibilityCanada's Best ManagedCareersContact UsTravel InsuranceCanadian ResidentsSeniorsVisitorsStudentsTravel Insurance FAQsYour PolicymyTuGoHow to Make a ClaimWhat to Do in a Medical EmergencyWhat We DoClaims FAQsNews & AdvisoriesNewsPress ReleasesTravel AdvisoriesWhy Partner With Us?Licensed Insurance BrokersTuGo’s Affiliate ProgramExisting PartnersPartner PlatformPartner FAQsAffiliate PortalOtherBlogDeveloper PortalTravel AdvisoriesLanguagePasser au françaisLove to travel? Sign up for travel tips & inspiration!Social Media© TuGo, 2018. All Rights Reserved. Terms of Service Privacy Policy Our Underwriters×Search TuGo We use cookies to give you the best possible experience of our website.If you continue, we’ll assume you’re happy for your web browser to receive all cookies from our website. You can learn more about our use of cookies in our Terms of Service and our Privacy Policy.×Advisory ResultsLoading...SecurityEntry / Exit RequirementsHealthLaws & CultureNatural Disasters & ClimateHelp AbroadContains information licensed under the Open Government License - CanadaClose$(document).ready(function () {
Email (phishing) and telephone scams are common methods used by criminals to lure people into disclosing personal information such as credit card numbers and account information. These scams intentionally impersonate trusted brands to leverage goodwill and avoid suspicion. They appear to be authentic and may go so far as to use logos and official sounding email addresses.
Get out of town! Plattsburgh International Airport (PBG) makes it easy with a growing list of airlines and destinations. Plattsburgh International Airport is currently serving numerous warm and sunny destinations through Allegiant and Spirit.  New in August 2018 PBG will also be served by United Express connecting passengers to Washington-Dulles and beyond through their travel alliance network. You can find out all the details at United.com. For detailed information on the airlines and the destinations, they serve please see the chart below. 
Email (phishing) and telephone scams are common methods used by criminals to lure people into disclosing personal information such as credit card numbers and account information. These scams intentionally impersonate trusted brands to leverage goodwill and avoid suspicion. They appear to be authentic and may go so far as to use logos and official sounding email addresses.
Whether you have a layover, overnight sleepover or you are just quickly passing through, our Quebec City Airport Guide is a great place to start planning your visit.  Here, you’ll find information on services and facilities available inside the airport – including details about airport lounges, WiFi, mobile charging points, lockers, 24-hour food options, nearby hotels, and everything in between.
The origin of the word "travel" is most likely lost to history. The term "travel" may originate from the Old French word travail, which means 'work'.[3] According to the Merriam Webster dictionary, the first known use of the word travel was in the 14th century. It also states that the word comes from Middle English travailen, travelen (which means to torment, labor, strive, journey) and earlier from Old French travailler (which means to work strenuously, toil). In English we still occasionally use the words "travail", which means struggle. According to Simon Winchester in his book The Best Travelers' Tales (2004), the words "travel" and "travail" both share an even more ancient root: a Roman instrument of torture called the tripalium (in Latin it means "three stakes", as in to impale). This link may reflect the extreme difficulty of travel in ancient times. Today, travel may or may not be much easier depending upon the destination you choose (e.g. Mt. Everest, the Amazon rainforest), how you plan to get there (tour bus, cruise ship, or oxcart), and whether you decide to "rough it" (see extreme tourism and adventure travel). "There's a big difference between simply being a tourist and being a true world traveler", notes travel writer Michael Kasum. This is, however, a contested distinction as academic work on the cultures and sociology of travel has noted.[4]
Other changes include: some airports have stopped curb-side baggage check, anything vaguely resembling a knife or lighter may or may not be confiscated (although lighters suddenly stopped being dangerous a year ago), you're sometimes only allowed one carry-on plus a purse, briefcase, diaper bag or the like, non-passengers aren't allowed past security, all passengers must have a document that looks like a boarding pass at most airports to get past security, you may have to put your toothpaste and shampoo in a baggie that may have to be a one quart size, some parking areas close to terminals are closed. But check-in clerks no longer ask you whether you packed your own suitcase.
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